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History-Molokan Funeral - BIBAYOFF, Nastia Semyonevna (Babeshoff) abt 1879-1905

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History-Molokan Funeral - BIBAYOFF, Nastia Semyonevna (Babeshoff) abt 1879-1905

Posted: 1213557925000
Classification: Death
Edited: 1401115752000
Surnames: Bibayoff
The following article was written about Nastia Bibayoff in 1905. CA Death Index: Bibayiff, Nastia, age 26, died 11/20/1905 in Los Angeles, CA (70); CA State File# 8160
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BITTER BLOW TO MOLOKANE.
Los Angeles Times 1886-Current; Nov 24, 1905; ProQuest Historical Newspapers Los Angeles Times (1881 - 1985)
pg. II6

Wife Dies While He’s Far Away Seeking Fortune

Local Russian Colony Conducts Its First “Pomeenkee,” or Funeral Rites, for Woman Whose Husband Knows Not of Her Passing – Unique Services for the Departed.

Somewhere in the vicinity of Ensenada, Lower California, Fedoro Beevaeff (Bibayoff) of the Los Angeles Molokane colony, is working away stolidly with the hope of amassing money sufficient to purchase a little patch of land as a home for his wife and babies, little girls of 6 and 4 years.

Out in the county cemetery lies Nasasle Beevaeff (Nastia Bibayoff), who was the wife of Fedoro. He does not know that she is dead, and that his little children have been passed over to the hands of strangers.

The first funeral of any adult member of the Molokane colony has taken place in Los Angeles. It is not the first funeral in the colony, however, for there are now fourteen little mounds in the county cemetery, beneath which rest the forms of babes who could not stand the privations made necessary in the long journey from Russia to California.

The colony has had its first “pomeenkee” or funeral feast; has carried through its funeral march and its funeral chanting, and poor, tired Nasasta Beevaeff (Nastia Bibayoff) has found the rest for which she could not take time on earth.

The ceremonies attracted much attention, because of their strangeness to the average American. They were carried through with the rites peculiar to the Russian Molokanes.

Mrs. Beevaeff (Bibayoff) worked in one of the city laundries. She sickened of a fever, and was finally taken to the County Hospital, where she died after two days. The body was sent to the home, No. 246 Myers Street, and there the mourners sit.

One hundred adult members of the colony gathered in the yard and at 8 o’clock at night the first funeral services were held. The deacons spoke and the men and women changed their psalms and office for the dead.

Yesterday was the funeral. Again the adults gathered at the home. The casket was raised by eight strong men and the whole company marched on Myers Street to the Salt Lake station, singing psalms and chanting mournfully as they went. The services were conducted by Rev. Henry Teichrelb (sp?), a Russian Presbyterian, who is doing missionary work among the Molokanes, but much of the ceremony was carried through by the elders and deacons.

At First Street a funeral car was provided and the company went out to the county cemetery, beyond Evergreen, continuing their chants and songs. On their return they were taken to the Stimson Lafayette Industrial School building, and there were served a typical Russian funeral feast.

The courses began with tea, served from the quaint old samovars brought to Los Angeles from the southlands of Russia. There were thirteen of these large samovars ranged in line in the open air, outside the school building. The food consisted of Russian dishes, and was eaten as a special tribute of respect to the woman the mourners had just laid to rest.
Attempts were made to get word to the bereaved husband of the death of his wife, but they were a failure and the Los Angeles Molokanes have heard not a word from him.
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